The Future of Everything

The Future of Everything will help deepen your understanding and answer some questions as it overviews the Bible's teachings on the afterlife and end-times.

Boekestein sets out to explain to everyday Christians what theologians refer to as “eschatology”–the study of the end-times as taught in Scripture. That’s an area that can be complicated and is often obscure to us, but the author succeeds in making all the main lines plain. Pastor Boekestein has a gift for clear, accessible writing which manages to be fresh at the same time. Although this book is a succinct primer and not an exhaustive analysis answering every question, yet the author packs in a significant amount of content as he outlines each issue. The reader will learn much.  

 

The Future of Everything: Essential Truths about the End Times

Reformation Heritage Books, 2019, 166 pages. Approx. $16 on Amazon.

Do you wonder what happens to believers when they die? Do you spend time thinking about what life will be like once the Lord Jesus returns? If not, Rev. William Boekestein’s fine little book will show you the importance of doing so. And if you already do ponder such things, the Future of Everything will help deepen your understanding and answer some questions as it overviews the Bible’s teachings on the afterlife and end-times.

Boekestein sets out to explain to everyday Christians what theologians refer to as “eschatology”–the study of the end-times as taught in Scripture. That’s an area that can be complicated and is often obscure to us, but the author succeeds in making all the main lines plain. Pastor Boekestein has a gift for clear, accessible writing which manages to be fresh at the same time. Although this book is a succinct primer and not an exhaustive analysis answering every question, yet the author packs in a significant amount of content as he outlines each issue. The reader will learn much.

One of Boekestein’s burdens is to show that how Christians understand what’s coming in the next life directly impacts the way they live the present life. A skewed view of eschatology leads to a skewed way of Christian living, from being lazy and careless on one hand to arguing excessively about the finer details of the future on the other. The author takes his goal from the apostle Peter who wrote on the last things in order to promote “holy conduct and godliness” (2 Peter 3:11). A more laudable purpose would be hard to find.

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