New Book: The Happy Christian

There’s a serious joy deficit dragging down God’s people and undermining our message of good news for the world.

The book is partly a critique of unbiblical versions of happiness; but it’s mainly a positive presentation of the Christian life in an increasingly negative culture. I identify the causes and consequences of this widespread and demoralizing plague of negativity, and I propose ten biblical and practical methods to re-balance our attitude, outlook, words, and actions in a way that will lift the spirits of Christians, compel attention for the Christian faith, draw people to Jesus, and make the church a beacon of hope in a world of despair.

 

As you can imagine, I’m rather happy to introduce my new book to you today!

I wrote The Happy Christian mainly because there don’t seem to be many of them around today. There’s a serious joy deficit dragging down God’s people and undermining our message of good news for the world.

The book is partly a critique of unbiblical versions of happiness; but it’s mainly a positive presentation of the Christian life in an increasingly negative culture.

I identify the causes and consequences of this widespread and demoralizing plague of negativity, and I propose ten biblical and practical methods to re-balance our attitude, outlook, words, and actions in a way that will lift the spirits of Christians, compel attention for the Christian faith, draw people to Jesus, and make the church a beacon of hope in a world of despair.

Although I make frequent reference to the current fascinating surge of scientific research into happiness, the book’s analysis and prescription is built upon biblical truth, truth that honestly faces the realities of sin and suffering, but that also transforms even these negatives into positives.

Once again, I’m very grateful to Joel Miller and the wonderful team atThomas Nelson for all their help in getting the book to this stage. It won’t be available until February 2015, but as pre-publication copies are beginning to circulate, I thought it was time to make it official.

David Murray is Professor of Old Testament & Practical Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary.  This article first appeared on his blog, Head Heart Hand, and is used with permission.