Is It Time for a Married Homosexual and a Female Muslim in the White House?

The legal and cultural pathway for a married homosexual and a female Muslim in the White House is clear of all hindrances.

The real issue is the world against Christ.  The Christian Faith defends life and is anti-abortion, defends the traditional nuclear family and is anti-homosexual marriage.  The Christian Faith worships a God who claims to be the only true God, and he is the God who rules over all things, both sacred and secular.  The Christian Faith is anti-polytheistic. These positions are unacceptable to both the Democratic and Republican Parties (and, indeed, they appear to be unacceptable in some churches).

 

Identity politics has captured America. The remnants of the privileged past of white Christian men must be crushed.  Christianity outside of the four walls of the church is for all intents and purposes irrelevant.

Maybe I am a little premature in my prediction here, but the push is on.  The liberal media is on board and even politically conservative networks like Fox News have no rationale to stop it.  Why is this the case?  Let me make a few short points that demonstrate why my prediction is not so unrealistic.

First, legally, the United States Constitution did not create a Christian nation. It created a polytheistic, secular nation by forbidding a religious test in Article 6, Clause 3. Thus, constitutionally, a married homosexual and a female Muslim have every legal right to be elected as President and Vice-President of the United States.

Secondly, yes, it has been proper to speak of our nation in her early days as a Christian nation, but that status has come to an end.  If we divide the definition of what constitutes a Christian nation into two parts, then even though legally the U. S. Constitution did not create a Christian nation, socially the United States was a Christian nation.  Both national and personal ethics were rooted in Christian morals.  Also, on a state level, most state constitutions required a religious test that reflected an identity of office holders with the Triune God.  For example, the State of Virginia was officially Episcopalian.

It should be noted, too, that in our early nation, civil government was identified with the several States more than the Federal Government.  The Civil War shifted that power from the state level to the federal level.  The identity of the body politic with the Christian Faith on a state level was lost.  With the influence of the Enlightenment and the secularization of public education, the coup de tat was complete.  We are a polytheistic, secular nation today, just a little behind France and Germany.

However, let’s be really clear here: The gods never co-exist.  What was a secular nation is now becoming an anti-Christian nation.  There is no neutrality when Christ enters the public square.  Another civil war, in some form or fashion, looms ahead of us.  The issue today is not a Democratic Party verses a Republican Party.

The real issue is the world against Christ.  The Christian Faith defends life and is anti-abortion, defends the traditional nuclear family and is anti-homosexual marriage.  The Christian Faith worships a God who claims to be the only true God, and he is the God who rules over all things, both sacred and secular.  The Christian Faith is anti-polytheistic. These positions are unacceptable to both the Democratic and Republican Parties (and, indeed, they appear to be unacceptable in some churches).

Some evangelicals are attempting to make bargains with politicians that if we do divide the world into secular and sacred, Christians will refrain from public criticism of ungodliness in the civil realm for a promise to leave them alone in the religious realm.  This is a faux pas.  It’s not worth the paper it is written on.

Christians have been silenced.  They are afraid to open their mouths in the public square for fear of economic and professional reprisal.  The legal and cultural pathway for a married homosexual and a female Muslim in the White House is clear of all hindrances. Apart from a national crisis or a reformation, the push is on and there is no stopping it now.

Larry E. Ball is a retired minister in the Presbyterian Church in America and is now a CPA. He lives in Kingsport, Tennessee.