God Bless Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis

How did we ever get to the point where “We the Supreme Court” replaced “We the people?”

Thus today, even when the people disagree with the decisions of the Supreme Court there is no remedy.  The people were misled into thinking that power was in their hands.  The people were flattered, but the people were deceived.  This seed of “We the Supreme Court” was planted in 1789 in Philadelphia, and it was solidified in 1865 at Appomattox. It was set in stone with the passage of the fourteenth amendment in 1868.

 

Kim Davis is the Clerk of Rowan County in the State of Kentucky.  She has refused to issue marriage licenses to homosexuals.  When confronted by two males seeking to obtain a marriage license, she was asked under whose authority she was acting in refusing to issue a marriage license.  She responded that she was acting under God’s authority.

Kim Davis is being faithful to the law of God in resisting the hubris of the Supreme Court who has usurped not only the right of the people in these various states, including their state legislatures; but she is also opposing a government that has usurped the authority of Almighty God himself.

It’s time for Christians to recognize that the Supreme Court is not really supreme. Only the God of the Bible is supreme.  He is the “only Sovereign, the King of kings and Lord of lords” (1 Tim. 6:15).  We need a few Christian heroes in our time and Kim Davis is one.

How did we ever get to the point where “We the Supreme Court” replaced “We the people?”  To understand this, one must go all the way back to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1789.  The members of the Convention actually pulled a coup d’état in secrecy. They were sent to shore up the Articles of Confederation which clearly stated that each state retains “its sovereignty, freedom, and independence” (Article 2), and where each state had entered into a “firm league of friendship with each other” (Article 3).  The Articles established a confederation of sovereign states.  The original assignment of the Convention was to strengthen the Articles of Confederation which as a document was built upon the concept of “We the States.”  This assignment was disregarded at the Convention and the United States Constitution was born.  This is why the godly Patrick Henry said “I smell a rat.”

“We the States” became “We the people.”  Instead of the locus of power being posited in state legislatures, there was a shift to a national proto-democracy.  Under the Articles of Confederation the President of the United States merely presided over the Congress.  However, after the adoption of the Constitution, national politics became preeminent and the President of the United States became a proto-king.  The result is the modern two-year-long hullabaloo of electing a United States President every four years who is expected to save us from our sins.

Every nation must have a sovereign who ultimately interprets the law.  The fourteenth amendment to the Constitution (although it was adopted to give citizenship to slaves) paved the way for what is in essence a government by judiciary.  The Articles of Confederation had given this ultimate power to the respective state legislatures acting for the people of their own state, and acting under a Triune God; unless they specifically delegated selected powers to the federal government.  With the rise of the centralization of a secular federal government, aided by the Civil War, eventually “We the Supreme Court” replaced “We the people.”

Thus today, even when the people disagree with the decisions of the Supreme Court there is no remedy.  The people were misled into thinking that power was in their hands.  The people were flattered, but the people were deceived.  This seed of “We the Supreme Court” was planted in 1789 in Philadelphia, and it was solidified in 1865 at Appomattox. It was set in stone with the passage of the fourteenth amendment in 1868.

It’s all history now.  Nothing short of a revolution can change things. A revolution would be very painful.  However, it is good that we still have a few heroes left in this country.  God bless Kim Davis!

Larry E. Ball is a Honorably Retired Minister in the Presbyterian Church in America and is now a CPA. He lives in Kingsport, Tennessee.

Read another opinion article: When does your religion legally excuse you from doing part of your job?